Review: The Legend Of Zelda: Majora’s Mask 3D

Published January 10, 2018 by Amanda B. Greene

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The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask is a strange entry in the franchise as it goes through a lot of different emotions surrounding experiences of loneliness, hopelessness, pressure, and so on. Its Nintendo 3DS version is no different in that regard, and has only slight differences from the original N64 debut. I’ve had this game for a while, but I just recently finished it on the last day of 2017; check out Father Titan’s Essentials Challenge blog post featuring me by clicking here.

** Review: 8.5/10 **

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Story

Link, after his adventure in Ocarina of Time, begins once again on a journey, only this time he is wondering alone with Epona in search of a lost friend. Riding through a dark forest, he immediately gets into trouble and falls into the depressing land of Termina, which will soon be destroyed by a moon with a face crashing down.

In order to save them, Link has to relive the same three days (for who knows how long), over and over again, until he is able to gather all the giants together to hold back the moon and defeat Majora, the evil spirit who possessed Skull Kid. Along the way, he helps the citizens of Clock Town and other places who are all suffering various problems as they all face certain death.

The masks that Link has to use in order to get past most obstacles have a lot of implications that are left up for interpretation, and the fact that he is not really recognized by most for his good deeds also says something about this game. Majora’s Mask arguably has one of the best stories to date in the Legend of Zelda series so far.

Gameplay

Majora’s Mask 3D plays very similarly to previous Zelda titles, especially Ocarina of Time. Link fights with his sword and bow, using many items like bombs and the Lens of Truth to battle and solve through dungeons. Since the main story isn’t as long as others in the past, the sidequests come in to pull you in further.

There are many masks to collect, and while not all of them do much, you need to obtain all of them to see the full ending. Some will completely transform Link, enabling him to do things that he wasn’t able to do before.

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The best part was how challenging the puzzles were because you needed to use more than one or two particular items or masks to push through each room. Stone Tower Temple is one of the best examples as the song “Elegy of Emptiness” requires Link to use all of his transformations to open the way.

Controls work alright. One issue I had was that Link was slow to shoot arrows when aiming down the sights, so I’d get hurt sometimes when I couldn’t kill enemies quick enough. But this wasn’t an issue most of the time.

Music

Still good to great as always like with most, if not all, Zelda games. Certain sound effects add to the dark atmosphere and stress of the time counting down against you. Particularly, whenever Link puts on certain masks, he will shout in pain, is unnerving. Playing the ocarina has its own charm with songs like the “Song of Time.”

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Final Note

If you are a fan of The Legend of Zelda series and you haven’t played Majora’s Mask yet, then I highly recommend it as this game does a lot differently than normal. Even if you are not, this is probably a good place to start.

I hope Nintendo in the future will reflect back on this game to see where else they could go with the franchise, since Breath of the Wild could have been darker and more story-focused.

Thanks for reading and have a good day. 🙂

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2 comments on “Review: The Legend Of Zelda: Majora’s Mask 3D

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